Exploring Our Potential To Take Action

Exploring our Potential to Take Action

 – Young activists growing up in Bali are proving that age should not and does not limit our potential to take action – in fact, it should work as an incentive to achieve and maintain change for a better future.

 

It’s been scientifically proven that we humans use only 10-20% of our potential brain capacity on a daily basis. That’s 10-20% spent thinking about and processing daily events, chores, activities, interactions and relationships, analysing, solving problems, and dealing with whatever life throws at us. I think it’s safe to say that we manage all of that pretty well, considering such a low percentage of our potential energy barely gets used in the process, don’t you?

Imagine what that other 80-90% could do. Imagine where we could go as human beings, as intelligent creatures with the ability to take action, to change, do, build, move and create.
Potential. Initiative.
That’s what these kids are using. Exploring their potential within the world to make a difference and change things they noticed were not quite right. Intelligent businesses with solutions that not only aim to fix problems, but spread awareness of them too.

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Dali & Finn Schoenfolder, co-founders of NALU (pic: www.B1G1.com)

The instigators of Bye Bye Plastic Bags, Nalu, and Kids Cut Conflict Palm Oil, all below the ripe old age of 16, are taking action as children to create a better future for themselves and their fellow young people. They’ve chosen to take action and change the way things are unfolding, environmentally, socially, and educationally. What has inspired them to do so? How have they achieved such levels of success?

 

Teamwork, Support, and Clear Goals

Dali Schonfelder, co-founder of Nalu, described the importance of teamwork and firm foundations in order to take action, asserting that “the team you build around you is so important”. Together with her younger brother Finn and consistent support from their father, she has instigated and maintained clothing brand Nalu’s success, with a policy of ‘Get one give one” in order to provide school uniforms for under-privileged children in India. These are realisations, actions and words of wisdom that are inspiring to hear from someone at such a young age, and a drive to make a difference that surpasses many older business owners of her kind.

The young siblings’ recent 4-month trip in promotion of the brand has taken them already to India, New York, Amsterdam, and London. Nalu’s aim, to ‘break the poverty cycle through education’ has allowed them to access and experience societies beyond those of the normal day-to-day routine, providing valuable insights for themselves, their peers, and for the children they are helping into realising the value of accessing potential, and taking action in the face of adversity. The exciting thing about Nalu is that this is just the beginning. Since co-founding the company, Dali has begun to explore and utilise her passion for fashion to promote the brand further, even securing a meeting with Donna Karan (of DKNY) in New York a few months ago, to tell their story.

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Students in India wearing uniforms donated by Nalu (Pic: www.greenschools.org)

Passion, Patience, and Presentation

The importance of being passionate about the work you set out ahead of you is part of Dali’s motivation, knowing that a clear aim and drive to succeed is vital to achieving any kind of goal. She describes how “Nalu started off so slow. It grew really organically, which I feel is so important to this kind of business. You can’t force it.”

The significance of not forcing ideologies on people, rather presenting them with alternative and more effective methods of achieving things is crucial if we are to evolve the way we interact with our environment and fellow human beings. Having the patience and initiative to try these new methods and appreciate the gradual changes as they occur, instead of forcing or expecting immediate change. Many of the issues we face in today’s world stem from years and generations of negative ideologies, habits and practices, therefore it makes sense that a generation may need to pass before we see any pertinent changes. That is why these young people’s actions and success is so exciting.

Goodbye Plastic, Hello Action

In a similar story, Melati and Isabel Wijsen of Bye Bye Plastic Bags began a campaign 3 years ago to raise awareness about the worsening issue of pollution and plastic misuse in Bali. They set a goal to eliminate the use of all plastic bags on the island by 2018, and to date have achieved an astonishing success rate, given a TED talk at TED Global in London, travelled around the globe and enlisted the support of thousands in an online petition.

Humble Beginnings and Problem-Solving

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An idea that started out as a humble Facebook page gradually grew and garnered attention from their peers and older generations alike, the girls described how all of a sudden ‘there was no going back’ – Bye Bye Plastic Bags was happening.
When asked if the success of the organization has changed the way the girls approach problem-solving, their response was unanimous – ‘ Of course it has….we have learned a lot….nothing is impossible for us”. This self-belief and confidence is just one of the many attributes of successful businesses and campaigns – it’s an attribute that lessens the risk of failure for any action taken.
The foresight and clear goals of these young people is truly inspiring and would encourage people of any age hesitant to pursue their own ideals to do so. Regardless of age, these young Balinese activists have a clear perception of their place and purpose in the world – something many adults still struggle with today. Taking action at such a young age is an exciting and admirable trait which leaves us with a hopeful impression for the future. As Melati and Isabel have stated;  “
Kids are only 25% of the population, but we are 100% of the future”.

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Locals and visitors alike helping a Bye Bye Plastic Bags clean up on Bali’s beaches (pic: www.surftotal.com)

Using Resources Wisely

Kids Cut Conflict Palm Oil is yet another group of enthusiastic young activists living in Bali who have taken initiative to act upon an issue they felt passionately about. The pollution from farmers employed by palm oil companies illegally burning their waste has led to smog and a wealth of issues involving the destruction of rainforests and natural habitats. Another group of youngsters who have studied with initiatives such as Green School Bali, these kids have been provided with the tools necessary to explore their potential, to generate a desire to take action, and the ideas with which to do so in a modern way their fellow young people can resonate with.
Kids Cut Conflict Palm Oil uses online platforms to spread awareness of products which contain conflict palm oil, and encourages kids to share their findings with one another both online and in the community. Through their online campaigns they’ve successfully promoted awareness of the damage of using conflict palm oil not just amongst their peers, but also older generations.

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(pic: www.wildlifeasia.org.au)

Bali’s Young Active Community

It’s curious that these new ideologies and stories of children achieving goals many Western adults have only dreamed of all stem from the same tiny island in Indonesia. Bali’s notoriety has been afforded further credibility with each success story, all of these young activists currently attending school here and growing up surrounded by initiatives dedicated to the preservation of the environment and promotion of health, wellbeing, and more rounded, authentic lifestyles. It’s enough to make any of us Western blow-ins green with envy at having not been exposed to such valuable life lessons at such a young age. Most of us who are now aware of this potential have had to go in search of it.

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Typical classroom scene at Bali’s Green School near Ubud (pic: www.greenbyjohn.com)

Progressive Problem-Solving

Imagine what these young people will be doing in ten years time? Imagine the kids they will have and inspire to continue their work, investing time in ideas that start out small, and nurturing them to grow into something beautiful. This is how Bali has proven such a successful fertilizing ground for ventures such as these. We need people who are open to trying new things, exploring innovative ways of problem-solving to address issues that have been plaguing society for generations, and that will continue to shape our world and our future if we fail to address them. Taking action in today’s world is vital if we are to create a better future to live in, and it’s inspiring to see these children taking matters into their own hands, instead of waiting for someone else to solve the problems.

If these young activists have proven anything, it’s that age is but a number, and it’s never too late or too early to start taking action and making a difference.Image result for taking action

Yoga For Creativity & Connection, and Why I Want to Teach

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The Yogabarn, Ubud, Bali

CONNECTION and communication lie at the heart of all our experiences and have profound influence on the way we live our lives.
Humans are sociable creatures – we THRIVE on interaction with others. Yet because of this we often lose touch and suffer miscommunication with the one most important relationship any of us have – our relationship with ourselves.
By helping others to see this and to subsequently address the way they treat themselves and put it into practice, we contribute to their overall wellbeing and as such (in the long term), to society as a whole. This is why I want to be a yoga teacher.

I love to talk, to explore new ideas and places, and most of all, I love to connect. I see connection and interaction as the single most important means of attaining fulfillment, of enjoyment and progressing forwards, and of existing within our ever-evolving and increasingly isolating society.

I have passion. I have buckets of this undirected enthusiasm, dedication, and drive that is waiting to be deposited somewhere relevant; somewhere it can be made matter. I have so much potential to contribute to something amazing – and I am aware that I have the ability to do so. Yoga has provided me with the tools to believe this, and to direct this energy correctly; to channel it effectively in order for me to succeed in my creative pursuits, thus rendering my ‘passions’ (which have always existed) somehow more relevant. It has allowed me to glean an in-depth understanding into the way my own mind and body works, and instead of frantically trying to escape or change this – to sit with, appreciate, and respect it for what it is; knotty hair and dry skin included. For within the external imperfections there lies a potential that is just waiting to grab the next wave of opportunity when I’m feeling inspired or enthusiastic or energised. It’s always there, just lying low until I tap into it through my yoga practice.

I am also aware that many others like me possess this potential, and seek direction and guidance for which to do so too. This is another reason I wish to teach. The overwhelming tragedy of ideas and inspiration and unrealised potential being wasted on anxiety and circumstantial or locational misery is honestly very saddening to me, and I wish to aid this creativity and potential, however small, however ‘irrelevant’ or trivial it may seem, to come into being. Everything deserves to be given a chance. So do you.

In channeling my creativity through the energy and focus I achieve from practicing yoga, I have been able to increase my dedication, output, and potential for further exploration of these ideas. It’s not all going to come at once, but I’ve come far enough now to notice the difference between what I achieve on a day when I’ve done my yoga practice and a day when I haven’t.

Connection strengthens us all, and when you’ve included and taken into account your own self within that mainframe of responsibilities and polite interaction, the potential created becomes endless.

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The unpictured side of yogaclass in Ubud…shoes everywhere!

On Functioning Through Chaos…

One thing I have learned from working in a chaotic, ever-changing and active environment is that one can never ever expect to depend on someone else in order to achieve a goal. If there is something you wish to get done, I have found the best bet to be self-sufficiency, being pro-active, and taking steps myself to ensure it gets done – otherwise it won’t happen the way I intend it to.
I may sound slightly stubborn and rigid with this kind of assertion, but I truly believe that to achieve any kind of happiness for ourselves, we must do so independent of any other’s opinions or interference – it’s finding a nice and acceptable way to do this and go about implementing change for personal reasons that proves difficult sometimes.

A few months ago I took some time to listen to myself. I quit gigging, I took some time off work, and I sat at home for a few days writing, reading, and listening to my needs, my own self, and nourishing my mind and body with things that it was really crying out for. What I found was that I had more creativity, ideas, and potential to give and create and live independently than even I had ever considered possible. The waves and flow of creative energy had always been there, buried deeply somewhere among the canopy of self-doubt, over-analysation, and damaging, poisonous thoughts which had led me to destructive and disordered eating behaviours and thought patterns. It had been stifled by things I previously had in place in my life that did nothing to help them – things I had come to depend on, and thought at the time for all intensive purposes should have been positive outlets, but that had really resulted in my self and sense of individuality being suffocated.
The confusion this created was so comforting in it’s extremity that I stayed there, stuck, yet to anyone assessing my situation from outside my own body, it would have often appeared I was in a good place. This false belief was strengthened by the seemingly successful ventures I embarked on, all the while eating myself up inside at the lack of artistic space I was being allowed (and allowing myself) to express myself and true way of being. In taking time to reassess my beliefs, my needs, and my own self as an individual human being as opposed to existing as a part of or for another person or group of people, I was honestly shaken to realise the power I have over my own life.

Even now just thinking about it empowers me. I have been given this body to live in, to mould and to shape as I see fit over a period of time. I can take it where I like, dress it in whatever clothes are available to me at a given time, and imprint upon it any image or word I feel has made a lasting impact. What I choose to do with my life is actually feasible if I believe in it enough to persist and continue thrusting energy toward it. It’s the choosing part that I struggle with. But I am literally a blank canvas. Every day, every moment, is a blank canvas that we can start building upon, or tearing apart with certain behaviours if we believe it strongly enough to repeat it consistently over any length of time.

I’ve come to see that life is a continuos progression from one moment to the next, each one irrelevant to the one which has gone before it, save when we choose to link them together.

It upset me to realise how much time I’d wasted worrying about what people thought, how I looked, how people would react to things that hadn’t happened yet or that had already come to pass…It was so pointless. The lack of control I’d had really showed itself for what it was when I finally took control, and decided to do something about it.
Realising this really showed me that although people may seem to be heading in the right direction on the outside, often even lying to themselves about being happy, there really is nothing more important than to finding what serves you, only you, and allowing yourself to take it. A chaotic and fast-paced working environment is occasionally the last place you’d expect to find such grounding thought, yet there is something extremely calming and humbling in taking a step back from the madness around and into the one small space of earth within one’s own physical body that remains within our control. Because in the end that’s all we’ll ever really have.

Enjoy, don’t Endure.

“I want to create a life I don’t need to take a vacation from” I don’t know who is originally quoted as having coined this phrase, and it’s been reused and rephrased so many times across the recycled and plagarised side of the internet that it’s almost vintage at this stage – yet in essence, it’s message remains the same. There are many things that many of us could say, and many an hour to be spent talking in circles about the need to enjoy life. Many things that many people would relate to, derive solace from, and ultimately aim to engage with in their day-to-day life. A ‘vacation’, or holiday, in it’s more European form, is defined as a ‘specific trip or journey, usually for the purpose of recreation or tourism’. This being said, it is only within the last two centuries that ‘vacation’ time has become a common form of recreation, the luxury of which was previously reserved only for the very wealthy artisocracy. The concept of taking a vacation has only crept into our own society in direct correlation to the expansion of the business class high-flying and bustling lifestyle. I automatically think of HBO’s Mad Men when I say this, Don Draper jetting off to L.A. every few episodes and spending every other segment half-cut drinking ‘old fashioned’s’ in his office . The development of the need for ‘vacation’ calls into question the very benefits of this so-called upper class lifestyle, a 6-figure paycheck often being pumped back into the system through crushing medical bills later on as the life of excess finally catches up on the protagonists and leads them to ruin. Mad Men obsession aside, it remains that in the way we live today, we can still observe work and responsibilities too often taking precedence over fun and self-realisation, downtime and enjoyment too often being interlinked exclusively with one another. They are something on which everybody thrives, when given the chance – who in their right mind is going to choose to spend the day in the office over a day being carefree and having the ability to be spontaneous? Yet is it necessary for them to be so closely related? Is it possible to enjoy the things we don’t necessarily have much choice in, those things we speak of and so often complain about having to ‘endure’? Not only work-related commutes and draining meetings, but also rites of passage such as family gatherings, school reunions, disappointing meal-choices, or movies that we don’t particularly want to see yet find ourselves in the cinema before, purely to satisfy the majority of the group? We enjoy our weekends. We enjoy the sunshine. We enjoy certain foods, and our own little respites and hobbies. We enjoy that long sought-after glass of wine and takeaway after a long weeks’ endurance. The two always seem to come together. It’s almost as if they co-exist side-by-side in some sort of twisted symbiosis that leaves us numb to the misery of endurance while it’s actually happening, in the knowledge that some little tiny piece of enjoyment is on the way. Ok, sure, enjoy your downtime, but is there some written rule of thumb or hidden guideline that says you can’t or shouldn’t enjoy your worktime too? In my working life I have too often wished days away and switched to auto-pilot in an attempt to persist through hours without thinking about the lack of fulfillment and authenticity of my actions for myself. In doing so, not only was I merely existing, zombie-like and emotionless, but I was failing to enjoy and appreciate the moment as it happened, numbing my creative and constructive urges by the necessity of tasks that no matter how hard I tried to make them, simply did not stimulate me enough. It’s upsetting that in today’s society people are forced to settle in jobs and positions that stunt the expansion of their minds and talents, purely in order to put food on the table. I am in no way trying to condemn those of us who work the 9-5, and who have done for years- hell, I wouldn’t be here today if my own parents hadn’t done the same. But for the sake of our mental health and wellbeing, for the sake of those few minutes’ respite of a tea or coffee break, there is a lot to be said for shifting our mindset from mere ‘endurance’ to passive ‘enjoyment’. You don’t have to be having the time of your life to ‘enjoy’ something. The essence of mindfulness is the acceptance of things as they are at any given moment, and so why waste any mindful second being preoccupied with the dread of enduring the rest of the day, instead of just aiming to make the best of what you are presented with in that moment? It may not be a particularly enjoyable or fruitful task, but I think I speak for most of us when I say that how we perceive and respond to things generally has a massive affect on our mood and overall wellbeing. Why put yourself through the misery if it’s not necessary? A simple shift in your mindset could mean the difference between a day spent flatlining on any sort of emotional activity, or a day spent relatively content with your lot, in the knowledge that you are where you are in that moment, and cannot immediately do anything to alter it. Even the word ‘endure’ evokes a sense of dread, a withdrawn and lethargic effort of will that in it’s naming becomes a negative experience . And negative experiences are things we seek to avoid, aren’t they? I’ve finally come to terms with the fact that I am ultimately the only person with the ability to drag myself and my own mind out of the gutter, and I have grudgingly begun to make myself enjoy things that before I would have merely endured, and found a kind of twisted solace in complaining about. It’s not to say I don’t appreciate the caring friends and family who have been there from the beginning, and who remain there to this day, stable and cautious in their presence. Yet there is a relief and independence that comes with being able to get rid of the stabilizers after years of enduring the embarassment of their necessity, and finally enjoying the sense of freewheeling adventure and potential that comes from being able to balance on my own. I wouldn’t have been able to do it without them, and it’s not to say I’ll never fall over or wobble again, but for now, my pink flowery bike with the white wicker basket is being tested for the first time, and successfully has made it’s way out of the front gate. The cherry blossoms falling down along the road don’t hinder my sight or pose any danger – rather they celebrate, falling confetti-like as endurance and frustration have finally paved the way and been substituted for enjoyment, taking a chance and balancing alone for once, as I ride off in search of the next adventure. Just enjoying the scenery as I go.

Just in Case – A Thought on Progress…

The unpredictable and erratic Irish sunshine is shining in on me this evening through a window graffitied with stubborn raindrops from earlier on. The world both inside and outside of my room seems calm, as although the weather doesn’t suggest it, it almost feels as if things might be coming to some kind of even keel as the escaped hubcap of my life spirals slower and slower to a managable pace where it finally nears stillness – still dangerously exposed and raw in the centre of the road, yet standing there strongly, and balancing alone.
The sun and rain go on around it, contrasting elements living in direct relation to one another, which have recently been spending an increasing amount of time together. It leaves me wondering are they growing apart, or growing closer together? It seems we can’t have one anymore without being half-prepared for the other, many shops in town boasting attractive stalls of both umbrellas and sunglasses side by side in displays of diversity that would leave Aldi and Lidl speechless.
But co-exist they do, and ginger hair and pale skin aside, one without the other wouldn’t be a comfortable climate to live in either. In considering my emotions and progression over the last number of weeks, I’ve come to a similar conclusion and final acceptance (after years of awareness) that the bad does not necessarily always have to be bad, and must exist in order for the good to be as rewarding as it is. Basic and elementary as this realisation may seem to some, it has only been through putting the extremes and contrasts into practice, subjecting myself to their power and destructive abilities and consciously suffering the consequences of them that I have once and for all come to accept them for what they are, and finally, finally, slowly and reluctantly come to learn from it.
I’m ready to let go now of what I know does not serve me. The length of time between acknowledging this and being ready to do so was far, far longer than even I could even have anticipated, the struggle in between proving more confusing and unpredictable than a badly-kicked rugby ball. Yet my body and my mind have suffered enough, and letting go seems easier now that I can see myself and true potential for what it is.

I don’t know what the next month holds in store for me, or where my next pay cheque is coming from. I don’t know where it is I would be now if this low had not happened or been allowed manifest it’s gripping, grumbling emptiness within me. I can’t possibly know any of this, nor change how I was before. All I can do now is keep moving forward, building on the mistakes that were made and shunning the negative tendencies that will forever remain etched as a reminder of the strength of my own human will to do whatever it is I set myself out to do. Just because I’m not certain of what I’m setting out to do yet does not mean I won’t do it well, because now, instead of worrying and jumping to conclusions I cannot possibly predict or know the outcome of, I’m progressing forwards, in the comforting knowledge that I have been able to deal with and adapt to changes I didn’t expect or plan before, and I’ve made it this far to tell the tale. The tools I’ve gained from getting here will remain with me as long as I just remain aware, and maintain a certain balance in myself which only I can maintain.
I do not, and cannot know whether a rain jacket or a bottle of Factor 50 will be necessary when I leave the house tomorrow. But I know that both are packed away safely and neatly accessible in my bag – just in case.

31 Obvious Things We All Know Are Important To Remain Balanced But Generally Tend To Ignore

Let’s face it: we all know the things that are good for us.

In some deep-rooted corner of our stomach or diaphragm, or wherever you feel your instinctive urges, we know that staying up that extra hour binge-watching Netflix is going to result in googly eyes until lunchtime tomorrow.
But still we do it, because it’s easy to give in to the urges and not think about the future in those terms—wanting to prolong the feeling of contentment as long as possible, and at whatever cost.
But balance is something that only you can find for yourself. Health service and medical advice aside, you are ultimately the only one who can know your own body and mind, feel your own emotions, hear your own thoughts, and heed what works and doesn’t for yourself.
Listening to your body’s needs and being able to heed them accordingly are two very separate things, however, and too often we let things slip purely out of laziness or for simplicity’s sake.

Sometimes it takes a subhuman strength of will to haul my mind out of the gutter of magical, idealistic thinking, and into the simple reality of what is. Because reality is simple. Here and now, right here, right now, with no thoughts preoccupied with the future or with the past, I have a sense of peace and serenity that stems only from my situation in this present moment, and only this present moment.
There are certain things and environmental factors which I’ve noticed help me to achieve this sense of self and make it more accessible in times of distress.

So, in order to further promote this balance and help myself return here when it becomes necessary again (because even the most balanced person stumbles every now and then), I’ve compiled a list of things that help me personally to maintain balance in the midst of mental, emotional, or environmental chaos.

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1. Rise early. You may not catch any worms, but you’ll certainly get a headstart to the day and a chance to spend some time with yourself and thoughts in order to properly be able to figure them out before the day begins.

2. Eat well. (An oldie, but a goodie.)

3. Drink water—this speaks for itself.

4. Get enough sleep.

5. Listen to your body.

6. Wear sunscreen.

7. Spend time with yourself.

8. Spend time in nature.

9. Breathe.

10. Read books while travelling.

11. Read books in bed.

12. Just read books.

13. Travel often. Movement is key to living—“If we were meant to stay in one place, we’d have roots instead of feet.”

14. Lock your door and dance around (bonus points if it’s in the dark).

15. Sit in a bar or restaurant alone, and enjoy your own company.

16. Drink coffee.

17. Write things down.

18. Write yourself well.

19. Stretch daily.

20. Yoga poses soothe. You know this.

21. Exercise to feel your heart beat in your chest—to feel and stay alive.

22. Indulge in chocolate.

23. Make playlists of songs that make you feel.

24. Do things that make your eyes light up when you talk about them.

25. Spend time with people with whom you can laugh and feel alive, yet who will also remain steadfast and supportive in times of need.

26. Feel your emotions. They’re there for a reason.

27. Take care of your body. You are the only one with the power to do so.

28. Wear what you’re comfortable in. Nobody (yourself included) needs or wants to see you pull up your tights again.

29. Cleanse and moisturize daily—physical freshness can help to have & fall back on in the case of an unexpected mental shift during the day.

30. Give your full attention to someone if they’re taking the time to speak to you—even if you’ve no idea or opinion on what they’re saying.

31. Wherever you are, be all there. Mindfulness and being present in the moment is one of the most straightforward ways to be at ease with yourself and situation, yet ironically is generally the last thought to occur to us in times of stress.

On External Influences….

Today I was faced with this image. ‘The Buddha of Our Times’.

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It really got me thinking about our values and influences as human beings, and how we have allowed them to shape our current personas, situations, and everyday lives in general.

The Buddha – a figurhead of mindful awareness that has (somewhat ironically) shaped people’s beliefs for millenia, in which a lot of faith and trust is placed, has been transformed in this picture into a representation of 21st century compartmentalized life and chaos.

Maybe ‘allowed’ is a bit too strong a word. Growing up it is rare that we have any sort of control over our external environment and relationships, and so often we find ourselves answering for the actions of others that have unfortunately become intertwined with our own experiences. Parental influences in particular are things that people find difficult to differentiate themselves from, as exposure from an early age is one of the key issues when it comes to shaking off unhealthy practices – children learn only what they are presented with, and so a negative habit or notion of a parent will ultimately affect them more strongly than it would were it coming from another aspect in their life.

But there are influences coming at us from all angles. The aeroplanes, helicoptors, and various other air vessels prove that it’s not just the obvious and visual aspects of life that can influence us. Things we wouldn’t expect, things that aren’t planned. They all impact on our inner peace and even more interesting is when we consider that they themselves have their own journey and personal goals and destinations they are trying to reach. We all get in each others way at some point.

The important and most difficult part is staying grounded and within your own two feet on the ground when this happens. Though this image is at first somewhat unsettling to observe, and would even evoke a sense of dystopian loss of identity and independence, on the whole I feel that after a time of considering the different elements here (and of our world), the overall form of the Buddha stays true to his original message, and is strong and accepting of the challenges posed by the world around it.

Heard Melodies

At the risk of sounding overly sappy, I live for passion. I live for those moments where you just feel. Where nothing on the outside matters, purely because inside is so brimming with potential and prospect for what is to immediately come or what is currently taking place, so much so that you sometimes get lost in the heat of it all and come shakily back down to where you originally stood, shivering at the ghost of the pure emotion that just rushed through you, and craving it’s power again.

I’m currently in a limbo between things that make me feel. Whether it’s a song, a person, a memory, a night, – whatever it is. That tingly kind of ‘I know I shouldn’t be so excited but this feels so damn good and I am twenty-two so why the fuck not just let myself FEEL it’ kind of buzz  is what makes life worthwhile. I’m not saying I feel nothing at other times, or in between buzzes, but there’s an excitement that your heart and soul reserve for only certain, special things – things I don’t want to ruin by listing here and risking their frivolity for you – and that’s what keeps me going.

The thing with art is that it lets you know that feeling, no matter how good or bad or unexplained, is always real and justified. Through art, we see people’s truths. People can express their BUZZES through a medium which is more widely accepted than an excited non-sensical text message trying to describe exactly how much something means to you;
‘omggggggggg have you HEARD Mumford& Sons new song omg omg omgaeohaeja akejrttttagndflgkadkfajrgejka LOVE’

It shows humankind for what we really are, and helps us to understand that we are all as bare and naked and lost as each other, following only the things that makes us feel most strongly as we move ceaslessly forward.
That it is possible for us to look at or be with another and feel such justification and purpose is enough sometimes to keep me going, knowing that truth is possible…..that feeling is real…we just need to give it a chance and let it take shape. The fact that I have yet to experience this is only a minor deterrent. I have come close, very close – close enough to appreciate it, and recognise the potential. Close enough to actually feel some of that ever- elusive buzz. In a way I suppose you could say that I have experienced the best of it. The lead-up. The potential. The uncertainty. The risk. 

“Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard Are sweeter;
therefore, ye soft pipes, play on;
Not to the sensual ear, but, more endear’d,
Pipe to the spirit ditties of no tone:
Fair youth, beneath the trees,thou canst not leave
Thy song, nor ever can those trees be bare;
Bold Lover, never, never canst thou kiss,
Though winning near the goal—yet, do not grieve;
She cannot fade, though thou hast not thy bliss,
For ever wilt thou love, and she be fair!”
John Keats

It will happen again…someday. Art dilutes the condensed, uncontrollable and overpowering feelings that life sometimes shoves at us. The undiluted may taste nicer for a time, allow us to indulge in the potential of things – but ultimately it is unhealthy, omnipotent, and damaging to our systems. My favourite way to deal with the urge to splurge on emotions, is to use my art, or somebody elses, or turn anything I see into some form of something that is art, and to simply buzz.

“Self” (Or, “I need to stop thinking so deeply into everything I see on telly”).

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“I think human consciousness is a tragic misstep in evolution. We became too self-aware. Nature created an aspect of nature separate from itself—we are creatures that should not exist by natural law . . . We are things that labor under the illusion of having a self, a secretion of sensory, experience, and feeling—programmed with total assurance that we are each somebody, when in fact everybody is nobody.

These lines from the first episode of “True Detective” really got me thinking today. Their blunt truth confirms the humbling reality of how small we are – how minute a single human’s impact upon the world really is. A year ago, more than likely I would have thus embarked on an ultimately pessimistic and negative narrative delving into the lack of meaning there is to everything we do as humans, dissecting aspects of daily life that highlight our flaws and pointless issues. But there are two sides to every argument, and certainly more than one outlook to take upon something so deeply involved with the human condition.

The suggestion that our development of a conscience and as such, a sense of “self”, has been somewhat of a burden to our kind is of course perfectly understandable. If it weren’t for the constant reminders and recommendations in media and social circles to “just be yourself” and “know yourself”, we wouldn’t ever question it. Our physical differences and quirks are what outwardly distinguish us from one another, and yet they are also things that we have very little control over. It is because of this “éagsúlacht” (diversity) in our physical appearance that we often feel the need to conform and to be alike in other aspects of ourselves. The notion of identity is often overlooked in favour of the feeling of “fitting in”; doing what everybody else does because it seems to the narrow-minded the only way to achieve goals– goals that are often merely a pre-disposition to achieve further compliance with the “norm”. “Normal” ways of dressing have given rise to the fashion industry; “normal” ways of speaking have left us with dialects and languages that vary hugely even within their own countries; “normal” reactions and responses to everyday occurrences and interactions have led to the segregation of some as “weird”, “out of the ordinary” and sometimes even (extremely inappropriately) “mentally ill”. The combination of all of these social boundaries and outlines with the average human psyche has had such a strong effect upon our consciousness that we no longer understand what it means to be unique, if such a thing even exists. Everything we do or say, whether pre-meditated or impulsive, is the product of circumstance – something we have recycled from our own individual experiences, and chosen to put into context of a current situation.

On the one hand, while each persons’ combination of experience is a unique blend, it is the contextualization of these experiences and knowledge that is expressed in our actions, allowing us to appear “unique”, while essentially drawing on our knowledge of previous situations and actions to express “new” ones. It is this process of analysation and revitalisation of ideas that has allowed the human race to progress though history – learning from the mistakes and reinstating the victories of others throughout our existence – drawing new conclusions from old ideas. While not altogether original in their basic idea, the combination and situation in which they are reinforced allows new meaning and understanding to be derived from these conclusions, and thus influences those in contact with them.

The majority of humans thrive on contact with other humans; whilst not altogether necessary to ensure fundamental physical survival, contact and communication is what has allowed us to develop as we have, enhancing our mentality and intelligence, and establishing us as a dominant life form. We have wrestled our way to the forefront of our consciousness, pushed ourselves to our limits, all the while under this pretence of “self”; trying to establish ourselves as a different entity to the other billions of humans on the planet. The illusion that we are alone in our thoughts and problems is merely an unfortunate consequence of the boundaries placed upon society by older generations that certain things cannot or should not be discussed, or are thought of as irrelevant.

If we are to consider ourselves a by-product of previous generations, hybrids of millennia of human reproduction, I think it is safe to say that we have not done too badly for ourselves, given the circumstances. No, we did not ask to be brought into this world, or to be given our particular appearance, preferences or confused accents, but if we continue as we have done, learning from the past and using those experiences to move reluctantly forwards, then who cares if we’re a little bit similar to somebody else, or like to partake in some of the same pastimes as others? We still have our own individual experiences to draw from – the combination of which you are guaranteed to share with nobody else on this planet. Make of them what you can, because as confusing as it may be to meditate on the idea of the “self”, it is ultimately what each person gleans from their own experiences that make them who they are, and not the experiences themselves. A little diversity is what keeps people moving.